The ecosystem becomes stronger.

The carbon sink grows.

Biodiversity improves.

The tree stock volume per hectare increases.

The forest owner’s net income increases.

When using the Hiilennielu forestry approach:

The ecosystem becomes stronger.

The carbon sink grows.

Biodiversity improves.

The tree stock volume per hectare increases.

The forest owner’s net income increases.

When using the Hiilennielu forestry approach:

Hiilennielu jointly owned forest is a responsible, productive and convenient way to own, manage and utilise forest. Hiilennielu offers an operating model that is more profitable than the traditional Finnish way to manage forests, and it supports the mitigation of climate change, creates natural carbon sinks and maintains biodiversity in unique Finnish nature.

As a tool, Hiilennielu uses continuous cover forestry based on the natural regeneration of forests. This kind of forestry maintains forest cover in the forests we own and minimises the need for clear felling. In continuous cover forestry, felling is done as thinning from above: economically mature trees are harvested, thus providing smaller trees with room to grow.

2.900,11

CO2 tn = carbon dioxide tonnes

Hiilennielu’s carbon sequestration calculator
is used during the growing season from 1 May to 15 October.

The calculator describes the increase in the carbon stock stock formed by the forest estates of the Hiilennielu jointly owned forest. The calculation of carbon sequestration
started on 1 May 2019.

Felling from the beginning of 2019 and felling to be carried out in the coming year are deducted from the calculator’s figure.
(The average carbon footprint of a Finn is 10.3 CO2 tn per year)

Hiilennielu’s carbon sequestration calculator

2.900,11

CO2 tn = carbon dioxide tonnes

Hiilennielu’s carbon sequestration calculator
is used during the growing season
from 1 May to 15 October

The calculator describes the increase in the carbon stock formed by the forest estates of
the Hiilennielu jointly owned forest. The calculation of carbon sequestration
started on 1 May 2019.

Felling from the beginning of 2019 and felling to be carried out in the coming
year are deducted from the calculator’s figure.
(The average carbon footprint of a Finn is 10.3 CO2 tn per year)

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ON FORESTS

The forest owner’s net income increases

Costs of forestry decrease when compared to even-aged forestry as there is less need for silvicultural treatments and mainly logs are harvested in felling. Log price is more than three times that of pulpwood. The greater share of logs compared to even-aged forestry increases income from felling.

The carbon sink grows

The average volume of the tree stock is allowed to increase gradually over decades. The carbon storage of trees increases correspondingly, with the carbon permanently removed from the atmosphere. The carbon storage of forest soil also grows as the amount of woody litter increases. The carbon storages of forest soil are secure as there is no ditch maintenance, clear felling or tillage.

The ecosystem becomes stronger

The aim of forestry is to attain mixed forest with diverse elements. Multi-species, multi-layered forests are the most resistant to winds, pests and diseases. They also recover from disturbance faster. Forests with different cover types produce different ecosystem services without interruptions caused by clear felling and the sapling phase. As a result, the symbiosis between trees and fungi is not broken, which ensures that trees get an uninterrupted supply of water and nutrients.

Biodiversity improves

A multi-layered and multi-species forest cover makes the forest a more attractive habitat for many species. In felling, retention trees and large aspens are left standing. As a result, the number of hollow trees and the volume of decayed wood increase and the forest has an abundant amount of species that eat pest insects. The forest becomes more resistant to various kinds of insect damage. In addition, a forest that has several tree species and trees at different ages is more resistant when compared to even-aged single-species forest. Peatland and mineral soil ecotones are treated with care.

The tree stock volume per hectare of forest increases

At first, felling is moderate, which allows the average volume of the tree stock to increase to approximately 1.5 times that of current forests. The increasing average volume also increases volume growth and felling income as a larger share of the trees are felled as more valuable logs. Increasing the tree stock volume does not decrease net income. Some net income is postponed to a later stage but their total amount increases.

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS
ON PEATLAND FORESTS

HIILENNIELU’S FOREST ESTATES

Currently, the Hiilennielu jointly owned forest has a bit under 2,000 hectares of forest estates. They are located in Central Finland, North Ostrobothnia and Kainuu. Below you can see some photos of Hiilennielu’s forest estates

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ON PEATLAND FORESTS

The recovery of the peatland ecosystem begins

Peatlands are the most important carbon storages among terrestrial ecosystems and play a crucial role in the mitigation of climate change. They are also a significant bank of species for the Earth. In peatland restoration, the aim is to return the structure and functioning of peatland ecosystems impaired by ditch drainage to a natural-like state. When trees are removed and ditches are blocked, the peatland water level rises and peat formation begins. The peatland’s development towards its natural state begins.

Carbon storage is restored

Restoration returns greenhouse gas balances to a level that is equivalent to a peatland in a natural-like state. In the long term, restoration has a climate-cooling impact when the peat layer that sequesters carbon becomes sufficiently thick.

Environmental burden on waterways decreases

The environmental burden caused by nutrients and solids on waterways decreases as a result of restoration. A restored peatland ecosystem filters nutrients and solids and acts as a buffer for meltwater and rainwater, thus mitigating flood peaks.

Biodiversity returns

The environmental conditions of restored peatland ecosystems become quickly favourable to mire species, making it possible for the species to return. Species recovery is important not only for endangered species but also for common mire and bog species, such as cloudberry and cranberry. Consequently, the recovery of biodiversity also promotes the recreational use of peatland ecosystems.

Versatile after-use of cut-over peat harvesting sites

The after-use of cut-over peat harvesting sites released from peat harvesting creates short-term and long-term carbon sinks. Forestation sequesters carbon quickly in growing trees whereas the less common peatland restoration sequesters carbon in peat for thousands of years. Wetland creation especially serves biodiversity.

HIILENNIELU’S FOREST ESTATES

Currently, the Hiilennielu jointly owned forest has a bit under 2,000 hectares of forest estates. They are located in Central Finland, North Ostrobothnia and Kainuu. Below you can see some photos of Hiilennielu’s forest estates

Hiilennielu jointly owned forest

Koskenranta 1, 90310 Oulu

Contact person

Timo Kujala

+358 400 100 670

timo.kujala@hiilennielu.fi

Hiilennielu jointly owned forest is a responsible, productive and convenient way to own, manage and utilise forest. Hiilennielu offers an operating model that is more profitable than the traditional Finnish way of clear-felling and establishing plantation forests, and it supports the mitigation of climate change, creates natural carbon sinks and maintains biodiversity in unique Finnish nature.

Contact
Hiilennielu jointly owned forest
Koskenranta 1, 90310 Oulu
Contact person
Timo Kujala

+358 400 100 670
timo.kujala@hiilennielu.fi